Regenerating material for the robot.

Regenerating material for the robot

The material contains microscopic metal parts that allow the robot to sense pressure, making it “touch sensitive”.

Scientists in Singapore have developed a material that allows robots to sense objects and also to recover from damage, just like human skin.

The material is called “AiFoam”. It is a highly elastic polymer created by mixing a fluoropolymer with a surface tension reducing compound. According to scientists at the National University of Singapore, this allows the material to “easily merge into one piece after being cut.”

The researchers say the material has many applications, especially in prosthetics and robotics.

To enable the material to touch objects, the scientists filled the material with microscopic metal particles and added tiny electrodes under the surface of the foam. Under pressure, metal particles come closer together, changing the electrical properties. Thus, a signal is given that will allow you to feel objects, understand their direction and pressing force.

It took about two years to develop “AiFoam” and according to lead researcher Benjamin Tee, it is the first material of its kind with wound healing properties and tactile sensitivity. They hope to put the development into practice by 2026.
Regenerating material for the robot.

The material contains microscopic metal parts that allow the robot to sense pressure, making it “touch sensitive”.

Scientists in Singapore have developed a material that allows robots to sense objects and also to recover from damage, just like human skin.

The material is called “AiFoam”. It is a highly elastic polymer created by mixing a fluoropolymer with a surface tension reducing compound. According to scientists at the National University of Singapore, this allows the material to “easily merge into one piece after being cut.”

The researchers say the material has many applications, especially in prosthetics and robotics.

To enable the material to touch objects, the scientists filled the material with microscopic metal particles and added tiny electrodes under the surface of the foam. Under pressure, metal particles come closer together, changing the electrical properties. Thus, a signal is given that will allow you to feel objects, understand their direction and pressing force.

It took about two years to develop “AiFoam” and according to lead researcher Benjamin Tee, it is the first material of its kind with wound healing properties and tactile sensitivity. They hope to put the development into practice by 2026.

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